Themes in Right-Wing Antisemitism: Points to Ponder

1. Why do many right-wing activists deny the Shoah (Holocaust)?

2. Consider the following quotation, which does not appear antisemitic:

“This, in a nutshell - albeit phrased in the most moderate language - is what it is all about. Saddam Hussein does not threaten Britain. He does not threaten America. And moreover British and American politicians know it. But Saddam is perceived, correctly or incorrectly, to threaten Israel;”

What has the UK right-wing racist John Tyndall borrowed here from the left-wing anti-globalism cause, and why?

3. Identify this theme:

“and the gigantically powerful international Jewish apparatus of political lobbying, patronage, pressure and propaganda has been mobilised to dragoon the United States, Britain and, if possible, the nations of western Europe into sending the best of their young men to die, if necessary, for Jewish interests and at the Jewish command.”

This is the end of the same speech, by the same person: John Tyndall. Who is therefore clearly the perceived enemy of the West and the anti-globalists?

4. These texts were found on http://www.spearhead-uk.com/0210-jt1.htm
(not a suitable site for legal minors or anyone without a fully protected computer and ip address!). The European report says that the British government claims it is legislating, monitoring and acting on Antisemitism, xenophobia and racism.
Should the British Home Secretary be pressurized to close down this website, in the same manner as for "Redhead"?

5. Read the following quotation.
Are the themes of Fascism and Antisemitism connected – and if so, how?

Roger D. Griffin, B.A., Ph.D. Professor, Department of History, Oxford Brookes University, argues that central to fascism is:
A. Anticonservatism,
B. Myth of National or Ethnic Renewal,
C Idea of a Nation in Crisis, and an Emphasis on Militarism.


 

 

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12 Feb 2007 / 24 Shevat 5767 0