• Ouri posing at an illusory mirrors exhibit at the Israeli National Museum of Science, Technology and Space.

  • Ouri, middle, with friends.

  • Eating food, hanging out with friends and wearing the Israeli colors on his hat.

  • Ouri, back left, with his Ulpan Etzion classmates.

Aliyah

A hi-tech guy from France interned at Nike. But he decided home was Israel.

“I really like this country – my situation is not easy because I still have to adapt to the culture to get a job. But I’ve gotten help from a lot of people – even people I didn’t know,” - Ouri Saban

When Ouri Saban made Aliyah in October of 2015, he felt that after a long odyssey, he had finally found home.

“I feel a stronger Jewish identity in Israel,” said Ouri, a 28-year-old native of France. “There’s different reasons political and personal that made my decision.”

Ouri grew up in a small French town in southern France before moving to Marseille and joining the local university’s science and sports department. There, he found a niche in hi-tech engineering. During his seven year university experience, Ouri took internships with Nike in Beaverton, Oregon, and at the University of Montreal in Canada. Ouri's family had spread out around Europe, and said he didn't feel any real ties to France. Still, the United States and Canada were just a little bit too far away for home.

Then a year ago he decided to open his Aliyah file. Israel was Ouri's destination.

“I really like this country – my situation is not easy because I still have to adapt to the culture to get a job. But I’ve gotten help from a lot of people – even people I didn’t know,” Ouri said.

When he first arrived in the Jewish Homeland, Ouri joined The Jewish Agency for Israel’s Ulpan Etzion program where students study Hebrew for 5 months and learn about Israeli society.

Soon after Ouri began to acclimate to his new country, he found The Jewish Agency’s Tech & The City program for young hi-tech professionals. The program is designed for young, motivated high-tech students and professionals with academic degrees, and includes an entrepreneurship course at the Technion. The program prepares its participants to join Israel’s high-tech employment market. It also provides them with adoptive families and enrichment activities including trips around Israel, weekly Shabbat activities, and Hebrew conversation groups.

Ouri has already begun interviewing with several Israeli hi-tech companies.

“I’m starting to feel Israeli, I’m starting to feel secure here,” Ouri explained. “I’ve met a lot of good people who have helped me, and I also want to be able to help these people back. For me it’s important."

But above all, Ouri, added, he's finally found a home, "It’s a joy for me to be here, I have no regrets.”

17 May 2016 / 9 Iyar 5776 0
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